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Influenza "Flu"

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Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses.  It can cause mild to severe illness.  Serious outcomes of flu infection can result in hospitalization or death.  Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.  Link to Health Department's Flu Page

Signs and Symptoms

Influenza can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death.  The flu is different from a cold.  The flu usually comes on suddenly.  People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

Most people who get influenza will recover in a few days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications (such as pneumonia) as a result of the flu, some of which can be life-threatening and result in death.  Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus and ear infections are examples of complications from flu.  The flu can make chronic health problems worse.  For example, people with asthma may experience asthma attacks while they have the flu, and people with chronic congestive heart failure may experience worsening of this condition that is triggered by the flu.

Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems related to the flu can happen at any age, but some people are at high risk for developing serious flu-related complications if they get sick.  This includes people 65 years and older, people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, and young children.

Transmission (How it Spreads)

People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away.  Most experts think that flu viruses are spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk.  These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.  Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth or nose.

Most healthy adults may be able to infect other people beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick.  Children may pass the virus for longer than 7 days.  That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick.  Some people can be infected with the flu virus but have no symptoms. During this time, those persons may still spread the virus to others.

Testing and Treatment

 Many people may only require rest, extra fluids, and/or over-the-counter medications like decongestants, cough mediation, and anti-fever medications to recover from the flu.  The flu is caused by a virus, so antibiotics are not effective against it. 

 There are prescription medications called “anti-viral” drugs that can be used to treat influenza.  When used for treatment, antiviral drugs can lessen symptoms and shorten the time you are sick by 1 or 2 days.  They also can prevent serious flu complications, like pneumonia.  For people with a high risk medical condition, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having milder illness instead of very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.

Flu Prevention begins with UPrevention

The flu vaccine will protect against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the season.  This includes an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and one or two influenza B viruses, depending on the flu vaccine.  

Flu vaccine is offered in a variety of settings in Monterey County.  Your medical provider may have flu vaccine for you.  Other alternatives are pharmacies, retail stores with pharmacies inside them, and/or community-based immunization clinics. 

Other ways to keep from getting or spreading the flu include:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.  When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  • If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick.  You will help prevent others from catching your illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.  It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
  • Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.  Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill.  Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

To find a flu vaccination near you, go to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

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