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COUNTY OF MONTEREY

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Nationally Accredited for Providing Quality Health Services

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News

  • It’s time to know your TB status and risk!

    The California Department of Public Health has announced that 2,091 new cases of tuberculosis (TB) disease were identified in the state in 2018, an increase compared to the 2,059 cases reported in 2017. TB is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases and is one of the top ten causes of death, causing more deaths each year than HIV/AIDS. The health department continues to advocate for increased testing and treatment of latent TB infection because treatment prevents people from developing TB disease. Latent TB infection means that an individual has the germ that causes TB, but it is not yet making them sick. Treatment of latent TB infection is essential to achieve a TB-free California. This year’s World TB Day (March 24th, 2019) theme is: It’s Time!

    3/22/2019 9:00:00 AM

  • Notice of Monterey/San Benito County’s Continuum of Care (CoC) Application Process for Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) 2019 Notification of Funding Availability (NOFA).

    On behalf of the Leadership Council, the Coalition of Homeless Services Providers (CHSP) issued its Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) on February 8, 2019. Eligible activities include; expansion of homeless bed inventory through new emergency shelters, warming shelters, transitional, permanent or other homeless housing; operating and/or supportive services for new homeless beds; rental assistance, rapid rehousing, eviction prevention and/or move-in assistance; street outreach programs; health and safety education services; criminal justice diversion programs; housing navigation services; landlord mitigation programs; targeted case management and other related activities.

    2/11/2019 9:28:00 AM

  • Monterey County’s Water Resources Agency is looking for community members to serve on its Basin Management Advisory Committee

    The Monterey County Water Resources Agency is seeking applications for three (3) vacant public member seats on the Basin Management Advisory Committee (BMAC).

    2/6/2019 9:28:51 AM

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Foodborne Illness

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Report Your Illness

Think you got sick from something you ate? Let us know by answering a few questions about your symptoms, places you've visited, and what you ate.

(Health care professionals must follow the procedure listed in California's List of Reportable Conditions (pdf) to notify the California Department of Health of certain foodborne diseases.)

Please Seek Medical Advice

Contact your health care provider, especially if you are:
  • Pregnant, elderly, have a weak immune system, or if the ill person is an infant. Any of these conditions put people at higher risk of getting sick if exposed to germs in contaminated food, and at higher risk of developing serious medical problems.
  • Having severe symptoms such as bloody diarrhea, severe nausea and vomiting or a high fever.

What is a foodborne illness outbreak?

When two or more people get the same illness from the same contaminated food or drink, the event is called a foodborne disease outbreak - CDC

Public health officials investigate outbreaks to control them, so more people do not get sick, and to learn how to prevent similar outbreaks from happening in the future.

What should you do if you think you have a foodborne illness?

Foodborne illnesses are infections or irritations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract caused by food or beverages that contain harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses, or chemicals. ... Common symptoms of foodborne illnesses include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and chills.

Who gets foodborne illnesses?

Anyone can get a foodborne illness. However, some people are more likely to develop foodborne illnesses than others, including

  • infants and children
  • pregnant women and their fetuses
  • older adults
  • people with weak immune systems

These groups also have a greater risk of developing severe symptoms or complications of foodborne illnesses.

What are the symptoms of foodborne illnesses?

Symptoms of foodborne illnesses depend on the cause. Common symptoms of many foodborne illnesses include

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • abdominal pain
  • fever
  • chills

Symptoms can range from mild to serious and can last from a few hours to several days.

Employees & Food Safety

Employees play an important role in food safety.The testimonial videos below show what could happen when we don’t follow good food safety practices.

Mari Houghey-Survivor of Salmonella Nightmare

Mari Houghey is a San Francisco area health care worker who during a weekend trip to Las Vegas consumed a restaurant meal that resulted in a nine-month illness caused by Salmonella. This is a preventable illness when employees practice safe food handling practices, proper cooking and avoid cross-contamination.

 

A Family Tragedy that Could Have Been Prevented: The Story of Zella Ploghoft - Part 1

On June 22, 2010, after seven weeks of hospitalization, Mrs. Zella Ploghoft of Athens, Ohio, died from complications caused by foodborne illness. This is an account of her suffering, hospitalization, and death as told by her son and daughter, Philip Ploghoft and Shelly Cooper.

 

A Family Tragedy that Could Have Been Prevented: The Story of Zella Ploghoft - Part 2

On June 22, 2010, after seven weeks of hospitalization, Mrs. Zella Ploghoft of Athens, Ohio, died from complications caused by foodborne illness. This is an account of her suffering, hospitalization, and death as told by her husband Milton Ploghoft.
 

 

Years of Suffering that Could Have Been Prevented: The Story of Kate and Bernadette

This is an account of the suffering, hospitalization, and near death of Bernadette Jacobs and daughter Kate as a result of foodborne illness. Bernadette contracted listeriosis when she was 32 weeks pregnant with Kate.

 

 


(Information regarding foodborne illness is shared from the NIDDIK website. This information is not copyrighted. The NIDDK encourages people to share this content freely.)