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COUNTY OF MONTEREY

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Nationally Accredited for Providing Quality Health Services

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News

  • Las Palmas area bat tests positive for rabies virus

    On October 15th, 2018, a bat found in the Las Palmas area of unincorporated Monterey County tested positive for the rabies virus. While there was exposure to an owned pet, Monterey County Animal Services investigated and determined that there was no human exposure in this case and is issuing this positive test information as a reminder to pet and livestock owners.

    10/18/2018 1:30:00 PM

  • Avoid spreading germs this Halloween

    The ghosts, goblins and other assorted characters will be at your door on Halloween. The Monterey County Health Department and the Centers for Disease Control urge you to take steps to protect yourself and your family from the “germ monsters” lurking around this flu season.

    10/17/2018

  • Halloween Decorating Safety Tips

    October brings time for pumpkin carving and decorating to celebrate Halloween. It is also a time of injuries including lacerations from pumpkin carving.

    10/17/2018

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Public Beaches: Water Quality

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For the latest information about beach postings or closures based on the most recent bacteriological test information, call the Beach Condition Hotline 831-755-4599.

 

INDIVIDUAL BEACH INFORMATION

asilomarbeach

Asilomar Beach

 

montereystatebeach

Monterey State Beach

 

carmelbeachatoceanavenue

Carmel Beach At Ocean Avenue

 

sancarlosbeach

San Carlos Beach

 

loverspoint

Lovers Point

 

spanishbay

Spanish Bay

 

montereymunicipalbeach

Monterey Municipal Beach At The Wharf

 

stillwatercove

Stillwater Cove

CONTACT WITH CONTAMINATED OCEAN WATER MAY CAUSE ILLNESS.

Do not swim in or have contact with water coming from storm drains. Such water may be contaminated with bacteria, viruses, protozoa, or chemicals, and contact with storm drain water may cause illness. Do not enter water after rainstorms as bacterial levels increase with the increased runoff into the bay.

Beaches are sampled Monthly from November to April, then weekly between April 1 and October 31 of each calendar year.

California Beach Water Quality Monitoring & Strong Pollution Prevention Measures

AB411 mapCalifornia has some of the most popular beaches in the country. Over 150 million day visits are generated by tourists and residents use them annually to swim, wade, surf, and dive. Beach visitors spend over $10 billion each year in California. For this reason, beach water quality monitoring and strong pollution prevention measures are critical for protecting beach goers from waterborne diseases. Indicator organisms from warm-blooded animals (total coliform, fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococcus) may not cause disease in humans, but their presence tells us that water may be contaminated with organisms that do cause health impacts ranging from fever, flu-like symptoms, ear infection, respiratory illness, gastroenteritis, cryptosporidiosis, and hepatitis. We use indicator bacteria because direct identification of pathogens, such as viruses in ocean water is difficult, time consuming, and expensive. Not only can humans be affected by these organisms in the ocean, but research into the cause of mortality among the threatened southern sea otter population, shows that infectious agents have been caused by protozoal parasites and bacteria that are spread by fecal contamination of near shore marine waters by terrestrial animals.
  • Beach Advisories or Beach Postings occur when at least one bacterial standard from the Ocean Water Contact Sport Standards issued by the California Department of Health Services, has been exceeded. Warning signs alert the public of a possible risk of illness associated with water contact. The placement of signs may be short term or more permanent where monitoring indicates repeated contamination (e.g. from a storm drain). Warnings may be posted where sources of contamination are identifiable and can be explained as not of human origin (e.g., resident marine mammals or seabirds) or of an unknown source.
  • Beach Closures occur as a result of a known sewage spill that has the potential to reach coastal waters. A closure is a notice to the public that the water is unsafe for contact and that there is a high risk of getting ill from swimming in the water. When a beach is closed, signs are posted alerting the public to stay out of the water.
  • Rain Advisories can be issued when it rains because it is known from past experience that rainwater carries pollution to the beach. After a rainstorm, bacteria levels usually exceed the State standards for recreational water use due to untreated storm drain flows that may contact motor oil, pet waste, pesticides, and trash.

Pre-4th of July Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) assessment map

pre-4th of July Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) assessment mapThe California Water Boards and their partners developed a pre-4th of July Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) assessment map to help communicate HAB conditions at some of the State’s popular recreational waterbodies. This map shows targeted sampling locations and recommended advisory levels for approximately 40 waterbodies statewide. Dots on the map represent sampling locations and are color coded by the advisory level recommended (no advisory, Caution, Warning, Danger).

You can view the map on the California HABs Portal here. If you have any questions/comments about the pre-holiday HABs assessment map, please contact:

  • Marisa Van Dyke - marisa.vandyke@waterboards.ca.gov
  • Ali Dunn -  ali.dunn@waterboards.ca.gov, and/or
  • Michelle Tang -  michelle.tang@waterboards.ca.gov
For more information about HABs, check out the CA HAB Portal.