Facebook logo 

COUNTY OF MONTEREY

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Nationally Accredited for Providing Quality Health Services

HOW DO I?


 

March 2019 Mar 2019
S M T W T F S
24 25 26 27 28 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6

News

  • It’s time to know your TB status and risk!

    The California Department of Public Health has announced that 2,091 new cases of tuberculosis (TB) disease were identified in the state in 2018, an increase compared to the 2,059 cases reported in 2017. TB is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases and is one of the top ten causes of death, causing more deaths each year than HIV/AIDS. The health department continues to advocate for increased testing and treatment of latent TB infection because treatment prevents people from developing TB disease. Latent TB infection means that an individual has the germ that causes TB, but it is not yet making them sick. Treatment of latent TB infection is essential to achieve a TB-free California. This year’s World TB Day (March 24th, 2019) theme is: It’s Time!

    3/22/2019 9:00:00 AM

  • Notice of Monterey/San Benito County’s Continuum of Care (CoC) Application Process for Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) 2019 Notification of Funding Availability (NOFA).

    On behalf of the Leadership Council, the Coalition of Homeless Services Providers (CHSP) issued its Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) on February 8, 2019. Eligible activities include; expansion of homeless bed inventory through new emergency shelters, warming shelters, transitional, permanent or other homeless housing; operating and/or supportive services for new homeless beds; rental assistance, rapid rehousing, eviction prevention and/or move-in assistance; street outreach programs; health and safety education services; criminal justice diversion programs; housing navigation services; landlord mitigation programs; targeted case management and other related activities.

    2/11/2019 9:28:00 AM

  • Monterey County’s Water Resources Agency is looking for community members to serve on its Basin Management Advisory Committee

    The Monterey County Water Resources Agency is seeking applications for three (3) vacant public member seats on the Basin Management Advisory Committee (BMAC).

    2/6/2019 9:28:51 AM

More

Care of reusable bags

Print

loading...

supermarket-cart-vector-illustration_fkK9-wdAs more jurisdictions adopt reusable bag ordinances, we all will be swapping disposable grocery bags for cloth and plastic-lined reusable bags. How should we care for our bags?

The fabric or materials in reusable grocery bags can get contaminated with germs like Salmonella or E. coli from food or other items. These germs could then cross-contaminate other food or items we carry in the reusable bag and make us sick.

If you use reusable grocery bags, here are some simple steps that you can follow to reduce cross-contamination and keep yourself and your family safe from germs.

Wash reusable grocery bags often.

  • Cloth reusable bags should be washed in a washing machine using laundry detergent and dried in the dryer or air-dried.
  • Plastic-lined reusable bags should be scrubbed using hot water and soap and air-dried.
  • Check that both cloth and plastic-lined reusable bags are completely dry before storing them.

Always put raw meats into a disposable plastic bag before putting them in a reusable bag.

  • A disposable plastic bag helps contain any juices that drip off of raw meat packages, which can touch other foods and contaminate them. Disposable plastic bags are usually available in the raw meat or produce areas of your store.
  • Throw away disposable plastic bags used for raw meat immediately after use. Never reuse bags that contained raw meat or poultry.

Keep meats, fresh produce, and ready-to-eat foods separated.

  • Use separate bags dedicated for meats, fresh fruits and vegetables, and ready-to-eat foods. It’s also a good idea to keep these foods separated in your shopping cart, at the checkout line on the conveyor belt, and at home. This will help reduce cross-contamination.
  • Remember that cold food needs to be refrigerated within two hours of leaving the store or market. Cold food should be refrigerated within one hour when temperatures outside are above 90 degrees.

Store reusable bags at home in a cool, dry place, not in the car.

  • Store reusable bags in a cool, dry place, such as in your home or in the garage. Higher temperatures, like those inside of a car or a car’s trunk, can cause germs like Salmonella bacteria to grow faster.

Do not use reusable grocery bags for other purposes.

  • Bags used for groceries should be used only for food. Don’t carry items such as baby bottles, toys, gym clothes, and other items in the same reusable bags that you take to the grocery store.

These simple steps will help you to reduce cross-contamination, and help keep you and your family safe from harmful bacteria.

Questions?


 

Laura Gieraltowski, PhD, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)