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COUNTY OF MONTEREY

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

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News

  • Family and Food Safety First this Thanksgiving

    Eating healthy this Thanksgiving begins with basic home food safety practices that are known to reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The Monterey County Health Department is reminding all cooks entering the kitchen this season to follow the Fight BAC!® basics of home food safety: Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill.

    11/16/2017 5:35:00 PM

  • Sixth Annual Adelante Con Orgullo Mujer Inmigrante (ACOMI) Conference

    The sixth annual Adelante Con Orgullo Mujer Inmigrante (ACOMI) women’s health conference is being held Saturday, December 2nd from 9 am to 4 pm at Hartnell College. This free conference is specifically for Spanish-speaking immigrant women.

    11/16/2017 3:46:59 PM

  • Safe Travels Via Salinas Grant to benefit 65+ population and Elementary Schools in Salinas

    The Monterey County Health Department announced today that it has been awarded $130,000 as part of a Safe Travels Via Salinas grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety. This grant will bring pedestrian safety education to the 65+ population and bike education to schools in Salinas. The yearlong grant start date was on November 13, 2017 and will benefit three elementary schools in East Salinas – Bardin Elementary, Cesar E. Chavez, and Dr. Oscar F. Loya Elementary.

    11/15/2017 3:54:00 PM

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Report A Foodborne Illness

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Report Your Illness

Think you got sick from something you ate? Let us know by answering a few questions about your symptoms, places you've visited, and what you ate.

(Health care professionals must follow the procedure listed in California's List of Reportable Conditions (pdf) to notify the California Department of Health of certain foodborne diseases.)

Please Seek Medical Advice

Contact your health care provider, especially if you are:
  • Pregnant, elderly, have a weak immune system, or if the ill person is an infant. Any of these conditions put people at higher risk of getting sick if exposed to germs in contaminated food, and at higher risk of developing serious medical problems.
  • Having severe symptoms such as bloody diarrhea, severe nausea and vomiting or a high fever.

What is a foodborne illness outbreak?

When two or more people get the same illness from the same contaminated food or drink, the event is called a foodborne disease outbreak - CDC

Public health officials investigate outbreaks to control them, so more people do not get sick, and to learn how to prevent similar outbreaks from happening in the future.

What should you do if you think you have a foodborne illness?

Foodborne illnesses are infections or irritations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract caused by food or beverages that contain harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses, or chemicals. ... Common symptoms of foodborne illnesses include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and chills.

 

Who gets foodborne illnesses?

Anyone can get a foodborne illness. However, some people are more likely to develop foodborne illnesses than others, including

  • infants and children
  • pregnant women and their fetuses
  • older adults
  • people with weak immune systems

These groups also have a greater risk of developing severe symptoms or complications of foodborne illnesses.

What are the symptoms of foodborne illnesses?

Symptoms of foodborne illnesses depend on the cause. Common symptoms of many foodborne illnesses include

  • vomiting
  • diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
  • abdominal pain
  • fever
  • chills
Symptoms can range from mild to serious and can last from a few hours to several days

(Information regarding foodborne illness is shared from the NIDDIK website. This information is not copyrighted. The NIDDK encourages people to share this content freely.)